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New Sermon: That You Might Come to Believe

Ashes2FireCover

http://www.discovernewhope.org/04-07-13-that-you-might-come-to-believe/

Ashes2FireCover

http://www.discovernewhope.org/3-31-13-easter-sunday-go-in-3d/

Ashes to Fire series continues as Tim preaches on John 20:1-18 about living the resurrection reality in our world today.

(one correction: Rabbouni is, of course an Aramaic word, NOT traditional Hebrew)

A Holy Week

www.discovernewhope.org
Palm Sunday worship: 10:30am 
Good Friday Communion Service: 6:30pm
Easter Sunday- Fellowship Breakfast: 10am, Resurrection Celebration: 10:30am

This Sunday is Palm Sunday, beginning Holy Week. Christians around the world celebrate Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem for the last week of his earthly ministry. Jesus entered Jerusalem for the last time to shouts of praise and prayers for the deliverance of God’s people. Hosanna is essentially a Hebrew prayer for deliverance: something close to “Save, I pray!” The people longed to be delivered from Roman cruelty. And Jesus was arriving to set them free. But it was a different kind of freedom he came to bring. Jesus experienced the political problems that every resident of Judea and Galilee experienced. But he knew he needed to attack evil at its source: the stain of sin in the human condition. There would always be another conqueror, but there will only ever be one savior. Jesus was a king of a different kind, a king who would lay down his life, absorbing the full violence of an empire to set his people free from sin. Blessed is he who comes in the Name of the Lord to bring full salvation to everyone. From slave to emperor, from laborer to President, everyone needs Jesus. Thank God, he came to save us!

PRAYER—O Lord, you have…

PRAYER—O Lord, you have set before us the great hope that your kingdom shall come on earth, and have taught us to pray for its coming; give us grace to discern the signs of its dawning, and to work for the perfect day when your will shall be done on earth as it is in heaven, in the name of Jesus, I pray. Amen.

John Wesley
Beacon Hill Press (2011-09-01). Year B: Ashes to Fire: Daily Reflections from Ash Wednesday to Pentecost (Kindle Locations 1799-1801). Nazarene Publishing House. Kindle Edition.

Recommended devotional guide

After Day 1 & 2 feedback from users I would encourage any Christian who wants to explore the Lenten and Easter seasons to pick up this daily devotional guide. It’s well-written. Takes you through the Daily Office plan for reading through the Bible, pulls highlights from these readings, and offers brief guides to prayer for each day. With your Bible in hand, you can go as deep as you want. On days you’re seriously pressed for time you can keep the discipline going by pulling from the highlights and praying. Along the way you have several opportunities to journal your progress and prayers. Inspirational Art. Prayers from past spiritual giants. A very complete portable guide to Spiritual Growth!
“like button”

Ashes to Fire Year B Devotional Guide

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What love is this?

Today is called Maundy Thursday in the Christian tradition. It commemorates Jesus’ last meal with his closest followers before his death. From this meal we have the Eucharist (thanksgiving) or Communion as the way to both commemorate Jesus’ sacrificial death and to experience the power of it in the present. It is considered by all or nearly all Christians to be a sacrament, a way that we intersect directly with the grace of God in our time. In our tradition (Church of the Nazarene) we call it a means of grace. So it’s not just an outward ritual. It’s a way to commune with God. We don’t emphasize anything magical happening with the elements of communion (bread & cup), but rather the act of obedience to Jesus’ command (do this…) puts us in a position where God can bless us in a special way. God uses the bread and the cup to draw us near to the center of our faith and Christian experience. It reminds us that it’s a relationship with God (expressed here in a meal) and not just a set of beliefs.
But in John’s Gospel the Last Supper commemorates the act of love where Jesus washed the feet of his followers. (John covers the Eucharist mainly in John 6). He wanted his community to understand that Jesus’ community was to be a community of servant-leaders who love and serve. You can read about it in John 13. Peter demonstrates that for some, the hardest part is being served. And so this keeps our communities of faith communities of Grace. Salvation is a gift and a calling. If we don’t keep these in balance, we lose our way.
So both traditions have been a part of celebrating Maundy Thursday. (The name probably comes from the Latin , Mandatum, which is the first word in John 13:34 “A new COMMAND I give you…, that you love one another.”) Celebrating the Eucharist/Communion and foot washing.
This year, our church is not having a Maundy Thursday service. But one could spend some time today reflecting on the meaning and significance of both of these traditions. Perhaps you’ll commemorate the powerful love of Jesus on Good Friday and receive communion on Easter Sunday. Spend time today preparing yourself for these events. Then think about how you live in community with others. If you’re not part of a worshipping community, consider connecting with one this weekend. We can’t really love one another if we’re isolated on our journey of faith. It’s in serving others that we really find fulfillment. And once we drop our guard, it feels great to be served. Let love not take advantage of others-those who are served are empowered to return the gift of life. It not only feels good, it feels right.
So there it is- Maundy Thursday. A chance in the middle of Holy Week to consider the awesome gift of love that we can share with others, if we would.

Good Friday service 7pm
NewHope Community Church

Is God your Spiritual ATM?

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Is God your spiritual ATM? Has it sometimes (or often) been your pattern to come to God only when you need something? Has confession of sin been like entering your PIN, something you do to gain access to what you want? At this point we’re slipping out of an authentic relationship with God and into a manipulative religion of convenience. Our god is reduced to a robot dispensing grace when we want it, resources when we demand them, and instant circumstance gratification. Sound good?
The problem is a machine god that does our bidding is an illusion. In this scenario we’re a little too clever. We’re not smart enough to know when we need grace. We have very little imagination when it comes to our resource needs. (Similar to the limited balance in our bank account.) And circumstance manipulation is a pipe dream. We lack control and our machine god is powerless to move others. (Remember it’s merely doing our will.)
What Jesus offers us is radically different than religion as usual. There is no guarantee of material comfort. There is a near promise of human rejection. In fact, sometimes Jesus seems really bad at marketing:
“Then Jesus said to his disciples, “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will find it. What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul? For the Son of Man is going to come in his Father’s glory with his angels, and then he will reward each person according to what they have done.”
Matthew 16:24-27 (NIV)
Religion of convenience is out the window. But in return:
We get a dynamic relationship with a living God who has walked in our shoes and overcome every trial we face. We lose automation. We gain relationship. We lose cheap grace and gain costly but infinite grace. We lose the illusion of control and gain the reality of trust. We lose material comfort and gain communion with God. We lose the world and gain The Kingdom.
In short, we follow. We lose. We find. We are kept.
In this scenario, forgiveness is something we ask for quickly because we want the relationship to be restored. Because we love someone and genuinely grieve over our own selfish actions.
“If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.”
1 John 1:9 (NIV)
He’s not a machine. He is the righteous judge of all the earth. He is the God who loves us, a friend who sticks closer than a brother. He is the jealous lover of our souls.
Gut check. Is it time to walk away from the machine god of our own making? Is it time to take up our cross and follow Jesus? (Hint: this works a lot better in community with others, called church.) He even promised to reward our new way of life when our journey comes to an end…
It’s Holy Week. Never a better time to get in step with Jesus on the way to Golgatha, where his cross was lifted up with Him nailed to it. He gave up everything. He gained even more. He invites us to follow

Good Friday Service: 7pm
NewHope Community Church of the Nazarene

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Easter Eggs Benedict…

Jesus of Nazareth Part Two, Holy Week: From the Entrance Into Jerusalem To The Resurrection [Kindle Edition]
Pope Benedict XVI (Author)

Just started reading this book. I haven’t read any works by the sitting Pope, so it’s a first. I hope it’s not a last. The first few pages jump around quite a bit. He says he’s writing from a faith hermeneutic (doing interpretation unapologetically as a person of faith) but with due attention to historical exegesis, within its limits. He says his goal is to reveal Jesus in a fresh way, making him accessible to 21st century people. I like what he’s setting out to do. I hope I start enjoying what he’s actually done a little more…and soon!
Yeah, he’s, like ,Catholic and I’m, like, not. I’m Nazarene (an Evangelical Wesleyan-Holiness Protestant Christian denomination-similar to Methodist). But I share his desire to connect with the most essential aspects of Jesus. I’ll need to remember how different our concepts of authority are and hold onto my tradition. But it’s less of a stretch for us Wesleyans than say, Reformed people. We’ve always reached back to the early Church Fathers in interpretation. (Not that Reformed people don’t) Most of the time we’ve been pretty ecumenical.
He and I agree that what Jesus did in the last week of his life changed the world forever. Nothing is the same. There is now hope for this world. I hope this book avoids sectarian doctrinal detours and simply helps the reader follow Jesus all the way to the cross & resurrection!
I’ll let you know what I learn!

Grace and Peace

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