Category Archives: Chicagoland

Beautiful Day 4…

What can I say? It’s so beautiful today! Such an incredibly small sacrifice so that others can have access to the source of life. I’m thankful today for God’s grace. Strength for life and hope for the future… Thank you to all who have sponsored me at:
http://www.tinyurl.com/timstidhamTWV

Day 3…Progress on a Perfect Day

http://tinyurl.com/timstidhamTWV

Prayers appreciated…

Watch the video above for some testimonials about the decision to invest in people who need clean water. I can’t imagine waking up each day wondering if my family will have clean water to drink. I am moved to partner with others on the front lines of saving lives. World Vision is a great organization seeking to share Christ’s compassion with those in need. The beauty of this opportunity is how it changes my life and the lives of my friends who share in the journey with me. As our lives are changed by this experience, others will receive access to clean water. Please pray for me and do what you can for those in need.
http://tinyurl.com/timstidhamTWV

A Journey Begins… Day 2 of World Vision Marathon Training

Joe Maddon agrees to 5-year contract to manage the Cubs

Tim:

Today the Cubs hired their 54th manager. I was on the scene to take in the reconstruction and catch a glimpse of the press conference. Joe Maddon is excited to get to work. He’s already aiming for the postseason in 2015! There was a buzz in the air. Partly from excitement and partly because of the heavy equipment deconstructing the old bleachers to make way for the jumbotron and other stadium upgrades. Maddon called Wrigley a cathedral; a magical place. Spirits were on the rise.
It feels like more than a new stadium is coming together. It feels like a new era. It did not come without 107 years of pain and a difficult transition between managers. But it feels like something big has started at Clark and Addison!

Originally posted on WGN-TV:

[ooyala code=”NjeW9ocTrRlgMy9A2ouLmQg9WfbT9AH9″ player_id=”4441ed2a84e74b66b60ce980f20deb84″]

Joe Maddon was introduced as the Chicago Cubs’ 54th manager at a news conference Monday.

Maddon, 60, will receive a five-year contract worth at least $25 million, a source confirmed to the Chicago Tribune.

He comes to the North Siders after leading the Tampa Bay Rays to four play-off berths in nine seasons.

Maddon is well known for his eccentric motivational stunts, like bringing live penguins into the team clubhouse and hiring bands to play behind players taking batting practice.

RELATED: Top 5 fun facts about Joe Maddon

[ooyala code=”s3OHRocTo9_fTT0FFFN6nFP9DkSJd_Mh” player_id=”4441ed2a84e74b66b60ce980f20deb84″]

View original

Wrigley at 100: The Full Cubs Experience

Yesterday was Wrigley Field’s 100th Birthday celebration. And it was quite a party. There was a lot to celebrate when surveying 100 years of history. Wrigley was built on the former home of a Seminary. It was originally the home of the Chicago Whales of the Federal League (a competitor to Major League Baseball back in the day.) To distinguish them from the Major League team nearby (The Cubs) they were usually called the Federals or Feds, which eventually became their nickname. Weeghman Park (team owner) was its original name. It cost $250,000 and was completed in 2 months, opening in April of 1914. Weeghman was shrewd. The beautiful setting and success of his team forced MLB to respond by letting him buy the Cubs in 1916 (struggling at the time.) Wrigley played a major role in shaping how MLB came of age, was in the center of several national political scandals that touched even the White House (Tea Pot Dome), and along the way became one of the best places on earth to spend time with friends. History haunts this sacred ground everywhere you look. The greatest living Cubs and Bears legends (yes they played here for 50 years, winning 8 NFL Championships!) were invited to honor this great park. The ceremony concluded with Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks shuffling across the diamond like he had for 19 seasons. Ernie was rightly honored most. One of baseball’s greats who always wanted to “play two” and even requested to be able to live on the grounds while he was playing. But he never got a World Series ring and that’s the other chapter of living the Wrigley experience.

It’s one of my favorite places to be since the late 1970’s when my dad would drive me from Iowa to take in a game. (Sunny every single time he brought me.) Every season brings fresh hope that this will be the year a World Series Championship is won in these hallowed friendly confines. This special day brought gifts and cake (A throwback Federals jersey for the first 30,000 fans and a birthday cupcake for the first 10,000-yes I made sure to get both!). It seemed magical as the Cubs were winning. Samardzija was pitching like an ace. The Cubs were up 5-2 with 2 outs in the 9th and 2 strikes on the batter, when relief pitching collapsed. How many times have I seen that movie? Alas, we were all treated to the full Cubs experience. Boundless hopes, historic atmosphere, great excitement, and soul-crushing disappointment. All in the same day! But it was great to share it with my college friend Lon. Just like always, one of the best places on earth to spend the day with a friend. It’s about so much more than winning and losing. A place with a spiritual heritage of hopes handed down. I park on nearby Seminary Street whenever I can. Here’s to 100 years of Wrigley. May we run out of candles before this place breathes its last…

IMG_0010 IMG_0013 IMG_0025 IMG_0034 IMG_0038 IMG_0040

The Last Great Cathedral of Hope

Tom Ricketts committed to Wrigley – ESPN

20130409-082614.jpg

Tom Ricketts says he’s committed. Here’s hoping he really means it. Wrigley is one of baseball’s last great cathedrals of hope. Part of me laments a shift to a “winning” model. There’s a reason why I’m not a Yankees fan. But I’ve been a Cubs fan since the last time we had a player named DeJesus. I remember 1984, 1989, and 2003. I was there when Wrigley had no lights, hoping a game wouldn’t be called due to darkness. I was there when it was only $20 to give your keys to a shirtless fat guy who promised your car would be the first out! (Now try $60). I was there when bleacher tickets were $4.50 and full of kids and well, yes, shirtless fat guys. I was there to see Dave Kingman, Andre Dawson, Ryne Sandberg, and the disgraced Sammy Sosa hit game changing or game ending home runs. I was there when Lou Boudreau and Vince Lloyd Skaff called the games in my earpiece and Jack Brickhouse brought the Cubs into my living room.
And I was there yesterday, for the first time on Opening Day. I found a free spot in a neighborhood many blocks away to park, so I could afford it. I saw ad space in 4 cutouts in the Ivy. Dozens of banner ads were tucked here and there. A cool new electronic scoreboard is integrated into an existing wall. Nice. I thought, “This is different, but it’s still Wrigley.” The view to my right and left told me this was still home. 40,000 of my closest friends there not really expecting a victory. Just glad to have some sacred space to watch a game we love in a beautiful garden of historic baseball delights. As God would have it, I sat next to a really nice young father who was new to Chicagoland and the Wrigley experience. It was fun to talk about the history and point out the lovely features of the friendly confines…
I hear talk of JumboTrons and luxury hotels across the street. Fine. The future must come. But please don’t spoil what is most sacred to every Cubs fan.
I would love for the Cubs to win a World Series. Believe me I would!! But honestly, we’ve all come back year after year after year because the Cubs and Wrigley symbolize something much more important: stories of hope handed down to each generation. I was sitting right there when it happened! I hope we never trade what is best about that for corporate franchise success.

Annual Christmas Update

Page 1

Page 1

Page 2

Page 2

Church Spokesman: No Charges Expected

A quick follow-up to yesterday’s post. The details seem quite fluid in this developing story from the Hammond church. First Baptist Church spokesman Eddie Wilson is quoted in the NWI Times today by reporter Chelsea Sneider Kirk as saying, “the church does not expect there to be charges filed in the incident.” However, Sheriff John Buncich is reported to say that an investigation by his department and the FBI against Schaap is ongoing. Age of consent laws seem to be the issue. As a father of teenagers I’m shocked to learn that an adult who isn’t a public school official can engage in sex with a 16 year old as long as it’s “consensual.” These laws seem antiquated. Knowing what we know today about psychology and living in a culture of extended adolescence, who thinks a 16-17 year old is truly capable of giving consent to her 54 year old pastor? The power ratio in the relationship is heavily skewed. And what scenario exists where it’s legitimate for a 50-something aged person to seek such consent from a 16-17 year old?
I wish no ill on the pastor involved. He should be considered innocent until all evidence is carefully examined. People are often quick to judge religious leaders harshly when there’s even a hint of a problem. And sometimes other religious leaders quickly come to the attack as well. So I want to avoid that.
I will leave it to others to prosecute existing laws, especially in this particular case. But I hope these laws will be reexamined to protect minors better. In Indiana, you can’t be licensed to drive a car until you’re 16.5 and can’t have passengers until you’ve held that license for 6 months. You can’t vote until you’re 18. You can’t drink until you’re 21. So how on earth can you consent to sex with a much older adult at age 16? Next, if others would be involved in arranging for the two to be together in other states, would that not constitute manipulation, reducing the power of the teen to give consent? Separate these questions from this particular case. This kind of scenario, if it were to exist, should be against the law.
I also would not completely rule out that an adult might target a high-visibility leader to lure them into this kind of entanglement. It would be theoretically possible to manipulate both the young girl and the pastor. Of course, that’s no excuse. And there’s no evidence of it here that I’m aware of. But this also would seem to be a form of crime something like human trafficking.
So many potential issues are raised in a case like this. It gives us an opportunity to reflect and learn. Like the case of David and Bathsheba in 2 Samuel 11, the biggest issue isn’t really sex. It’s the abuse of power. Somehow current consent laws need to take this into greater consideration. What do you think?

Hammond Baptist dismisses pastor for ‘sin’

Hammond Baptist dismisses pastor for ‘sin’ : Lake.

Wow. A lot of thoughts swirl through my mind. Then I’m speechless. Then I’m theological. Then I’m sad. Then I’m judge and jury. Then I imagine how his family and the young girl and her family feel and the cycle starts again. Who is Pastor Jack? How do you go from called to preach to sneaking into other states with an underaged girl? (I don’t actually want to know!)
But as I prepare a previously scheduled sermon on the Lectionary passage of 2 Samuel 11, I’m amazed by the timing. I was scheduled to preach the first half of the story last week, but felt led in a different direction at the last minute. (A fairly rare thing for my ministry). But this story reads like a modern parable on David’s sin. And the Sandusky and Philadelphia scandals cry out for this passage to be unpacked. So perhaps the Lord didn’t want me to begin until this bit of news broke.
I don’t know Jack personally, so I have no starting point to judge his case. But if what has been alleged is true, every church and pastor will be somewhat affected. I’ve had my doubts (since the 1980’s) about how Hammond First Baptist has operated. I have to be honest. Yet, I also have often pointed out that they have a homeless shelter and good people do amazing good through several of its ministries. Pastor Jack helped a lot of really good things happen. But he apparently lost his way in a devastating way and is alleged to have taken actions no one can condone. The temptation is to judge harshly and distance oneself from “guys like him” with angry words, maybe even gloating a bit. But these are dark temptations in themselves and would be a mistake. Stone throwing? Nope.
There should be no joy here. There should be much prayer for all involved. Every church should re-examine procedures and policies. Christian leaders should examine their own hearts, seeking to be filled with more of God’s holy love and less of the world.
Penn State. First Baptist Church. Both great institutions with great potential where things that could happen anywhere started to happen a while ago, but an environment of tight control ironically unleashed chaos. Rather than looking down our noses, we should hit our knees and look up to heaven. What changes could be implemented to decrease the likelihood of a leader to stray? Are there helps that could be put in place to help struggling leaders overcome temptation? What safeguards should be revamped to protect innocent children more? How can we cultivate environments where only holy love is shared and where purity of heart wins the day? I’m glad the congregation I serve has always taken child safety seriously. But you can bet we’ll be reviewing all of the above for improvements! Lord, may your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as in heaven. Amen.
Our series on David just became strikingly relevant. I’m sad for the circumstances and pain but thankful I know where to turn to find direction. (Even more glad I was already turning there.) Through it all, God is amazing! Young preachers, take note that the Lectionary can sometimes be amazingly relevant. (Even if sometimes, not!) Take note also that you should listen when the Lord guides you in various directions to override your plan. Take note finally that everything you build under God can go down in flames in an hour if boundaries and safeguards are neglected.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,422 other followers

%d bloggers like this: